liboplay

All Stories

  1. a wild red jungle fowl, which looks like a colorful rooster, standing in a forest
    Animals

     Chicken DNA is replacing the genetics of their ancestral jungle fowl

    Up to half of modern jungle fowl genes have been inherited from domesticated chickens. That could threaten the wild birds’ long-term survival.
    By
  2. aerial photo of San Francisco at night
    Astronomy

     New data show how quickly light pollution is obscuring the night sky

    Tens of thousands of observations from citizen scientists spanning a decade show that the night sky is getting about 10 percent brighter every year.
    By
  3. A microscopic image of the bacterial species Streptococcus salivarius.
    Health & Medicine

     Too much of this bacteria in the nose may worsen allergy symptoms

    Hay fever sufferers have an overabundance of Streptococcus salivarius. The mucus-loving bacteria boost inflammation, causing an endlessly runny nose.

    By
  4. tiny animals from the Chinese zodiac, made in hydrogels of different colors. Top row from left: purple monkey, yellow and purple pig, yellow and purple snake, bluish gray dog, green rabbit. Bottom row from left: green tiger, yellow goat, orange horse, purple rooster, teal rat.
    Materials Science

    Want a ‘Shrinky Dinks’ approach to nano-sized devices? Try hydrogels

    Patterning hydrogels with a laser and then shrinking them down with chemicals offers a way to make nanoscopic structures out of many materials.
    By
  5. Three Halteria ciliates shown on a blue background
    Microbes

     Scientists have found the first known microbes that can eat only viruses

    Lab experiments show that Halteria ciliates can chow down solely on viruses. Whether these “virovores” do the same in the wild is unclear.

    By
  6. an echidna standing in tall grass
    Animals

     These adorable Australian spike-balls beat the heat with snot bubbles

    An echidna’s snot bubbles coat the spiny critter’s nose with moisture, which then evaporates and draws heat from the sinus, cooling the blood.
    By
  7. The Pantheon in Rome still stands including its soaring dome.
    Chemistry

     These chemists cracked the code to long-lasting Roman concrete

    Roman concrete has stood the test of time, so scientists searched ruins to unlock the ancient recipe that could help architecture and climate change.
    By
  8. A satellite view of an arctic cyclone taken in August 2012.
    Climate

     Cyclones in the Arctic are becoming more intense and frequent

    Over the last 70 years, boreal storms have steadily grown stronger. And climate change may make them worse, threatening both people and sea ice.
    By
  9. A telecom tower stands atop the Säntis mountain in Switzerland against a cloudy sky. A green laser marks the path of the powerful laser in this story.
    Physics

     A powerful laser can redirect lightning strikes

    In a mountaintop experiment, a laser beamed into the sky created a virtual lightning rod that snagged several bolts before they hit the ground.
    By
  10. A photo of China's maglev train as it comes into a station with several people standing at balcony of a nearby platform.
    Chemistry

    How rare earth elements’ hidden properties make modern technology possible

    Because of their unique chemistry, the rare earth elements can fine-tune light for many different purposes and generate powerful magnetic fields.
    By
  11. A line of people wearing masks wait in line behind a sign for free COVID-19 vaccines.
    Health & Medicine

     Here’s what you need to know about COVID’s XBB.1.5 ‘Kraken’ variant

    XBB.1.5, an offshoot of the coronavirus’s omicron variant, can hide from parts of the immune system, but vaccines and some treatments still work.
    By
  12. A chain of craters on Enceladus looks like a Saturnian snowman.
    Planetary Science

     Enceladus is blanketed in a thick layer of snow

    Pits on the Saturnian moon reveal the surprising depth of the satellite’s snow, suggesting its plume was more active in the past.
    By